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Destiny|سرنوشت


Story By: Laleh Chini

I remember there was an old ruined mansion in Bushehr where people could pay a little amount to go inside. We visited the wrecked house a few times in my childhood. The story behind it was so sad but more importantly, a life lesson which was probably why they took us to the palace several times.

roof-540835_960_720????The story goes that the owner was a very rich merchant who was a profligate spender to show off how wealthy he was. People used to say he lit his cigars with burning bills instead of matches in front of others and when big politicians came to Bushehr from the Capital Tehran, he lit candles with bills to show how powerful and rich he was.burning-money-2113914_960_720He used to serve tea in gold tea cups and eat in silver plates and dishes. He was never friendly with anyone and found it disgraceful to talk to the poor.pots-186553_960_720

Eventually, he lost everything, went bankrupt and died without a penny to leave for his children. The poor people who now lived in the mansion with no windows or doors and partially no roof and walls, were his grand children who owned the land. They lived very impoverish lives.person-1172018_960_720They survived with general labors and the money people paid to see the ruined house. They never talked to anyone, nor answered any questions.  It was obvious that they were so ashamed of their grandfather’s past.

My father said that no one ever offered them any jobs because their grandfather was so cruel to the town, and never respected anyone as he saw himself as a superior.

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Categories: iran, Legend, memoir, memories, memory, middle east, Myths, poverty, short stories, short story, True story, Uncategorized

495 comments

  1. Nominated you for the Sunshine Blogger Award because I love your blog! 🙂
    https://imageearthtravel.com/2018/07/15/sunshine-blogger-award-2/

    Liked by 5 people

  2. both were caught in the cycle…He didn’t talk to people neither did they…operating out of negativity is a high price to pay…His arrogance looked like their shame… I am not a slave to the past of my family… I have my own beginnings… thanks for sharing such a powerful lesson

    Liked by 5 people

  3. I really enjoyed your powerful message, thank you for sharing this story 💜

    Liked by 3 people

  4. A good lesson for rich people who have no compassion for the poor!

    Liked by 3 people

  5. A very good lesson to be learned from this story.

    ❤️carmen

    Liked by 3 people

  6. thank you for sharing. But feel so sorry for the whole clan, the sin of a grandfather is not the sin of all 😦

    Liked by 2 people

  7. Hello Laleh Chini,

    That was quite a rise and fall, it is sad what happened to the grandchildren, thank you for sharing this story.

    -John Jr

    Liked by 3 people

  8. such a great information for blogger i am a professional blogger thanks

    Liked by 2 people

  9. Such a simple story yet a strong and interesting narrative with the most valuable lesson. That’s what a magical writer does, makes the simplest of stories worth telling 🙂 .

    Liked by 3 people

  10. Excellent post. It’s a shame that many in society never learned to help others with their means. Just imagine if this money and success could have been used to help build up others and help them to succeed.

    Liked by 3 people

  11. to blame someone not responsible is just as bad as the original sin.The people who held a grudge against the father & his innocent family are no better.Human nature is so predictable sometimes.
    great read!

    Liked by 2 people

  12. Fascinating story, Laleh. Thank you.

    The town is so cruel to the grandchildren. But I guess that’s human nature sometimes. I’ve know families in the small town I grew up in who held grudges against another family for generations.

    Liked by 2 people

  13. Hi Laleh, this is definitely a sad story, not so much as how the rich mogul ended up poor, but about how his grandchildren have been treated by the community….. the grudge/hatred still being displayed reeks of how our modern societies still maintain grudges/racial prejudices these days.

    Liked by 2 people

  14. Missed reading your stories Laleh. ❤️

    Liked by 2 people

  15. How right is the proverb ” Pride goes before the fall”.

    Liked by 2 people

  16. I really appreciate your kind word, and you described it so well. Thanks for sharing this information.

    Liked by 2 people

  17. Money really goes to people’s heads and not in a good way! Nice to meet you!

    Liked by 2 people

  18. hello, thank you for following my blog, i really appreciated it, i loved what you shared in this blog, and looking forward to hear more stories from Iran 😊

    best regard
    maya

    Liked by 2 people

  19. So many comments! I wanted to thank you for following my blog. It is an honor. May I ask how you found it, what led you to follow it, and do you bike? For me I’m trying to write my book four days a week and blog the other three, do biking so I have something to write about (biking can take 5-15 hours per week!), plus walking and yoga (1 hour per day total). Also have to live life and try to find work. I don’t know how people find the time to read everyone! But I thank you and hope to see your blog again soon.

    Liked by 2 people

    • I was reading a blog and saw your comment, and followed you. I biked four times a week for a whole summer a few years ago to keep in shape.
      Now I go to gym 3-4 times a week. Thanks for following back.
      My book is “Climbing Over Grit” took me seven years to finish and find a publisher. I guess never give up is my nickname.😂

      Liked by 1 person

  20. Thank you for this story about a lesson of life. Being rich also seems like an exam, you can fail. One can miss dealing with wealth in the sense of humanity. Thank you for following my Mary-Blog. I follow your Blog with theses interesting stories about the Iranian culture. It is very important to hear about the different cultures. Love Susanne

    Liked by 2 people

  21. WOW. That is an interesting back story. It’s very sad but you reap what you sow. It may not directly be you… someone you love may endure the agony to come. I hope their children break the cycle and turn their generational curse around.

    Liked by 2 people

  22. This story would include nearly every rich person. I’m not saying they burn money to impress their friends but how many really talk to the poor? The only difference with this man is he lost everything while many others didn’t but their demeanor is the same.

    Liked by 2 people

  23. Read this tragic story again but a good lesson in ‘we reap what we sow’ in life.

    Liked by 2 people

  24. Le. colpe dei padri non devono essere pagate dai figli! Non è giusto né morale.

    shera

    Liked by 2 people

  25. This was very interesting. So sad though, suffering a punishment of a sin they didn’t even commit. But I’m thinking if they weren’t bankrupt would the children and grandchildren would be humble and not like the Grandfather? But we’ll never know.

    Liked by 2 people

  26. your story is a lesson to all humanity to be compassionate and loving towards one and all. Glad to see you follow me . Read my posts. they are equally interesting.

    Liked by 2 people

  27. Very good history story, reality does tend to have a way to come back and bite us in the behind. I Enjoyed the read so I am going to reblog this story for you.

    Liked by 1 person

  28. WEAVERS

    The past casts shadows over the present
    Just as the present casts shadows over the future
    Everything in the one tapestry is interwoven
    The wise weaver will bear this fact in mind
    And so avoids the trap of uncaring isolation

    Liked by 1 person

  29. I really enjoyed reading this, thank you for sharing. your work is so captivating.

    Liked by 1 person

  30. hello, is a beautiful article! as an answer I would like to mention the poetry of the great “Toto” ‘entitled “A Livella”: https://www.rockol.it/testi/5135200/toto-a-livella
    the final message is that rich or poor we are all equal before death.

    Liked by 1 person

  31. It’s great to read the story.

    Liked by 1 person

  32. I love your blog.

    Liked by 1 person

  33. So sad that the children and grandchildren were not given a chance to see if they were different. Life is full of lessons and I appreciate the lesson you write about. I do believe that most people are good.

    Liked by 1 person

  34. Wow, what a powerful story of this family. Thank you for sharing. I’m grateful to meet you, so glad you found my blog. Blessings to you and your daughters.
    =Debbie

    Liked by 1 person

  35. Thank you for sharing – greetings vom austria

    Liked by 1 person

  36. Lovely historical story, sadly the suffering is passed on to the next generations it should not be so as they were not responsible for creating the misery of others.

    Liked by 1 person

  37. Hello, dear Laleh! I have nominated you for the Blogger Recognition Award!
    I hope you could honor my nomination. Thank you!

    Liked by 1 person

  38. A wonderful story, quite interesting.

    Liked by 1 person

  39. That is so sad that the grandchildren can’t get jobs or anything because of the grandfather.
    BTW, I have just nominated you for the “Mystery Blogger Award”. If you want to participate, here is the link:
    http://idoalotofreading.wordpress.com/2018/10/31/mystery-blogger-award/

    Liked by 1 person

  40. A very good lesson to be learned from this story!❤

    Liked by 1 person

  41. Congratulations, Laleh!

    I have nominated your blog for the Versatile Blogger Award.

    More about this nomination is at

    https://dearkitty1.wordpress.com/2018/11/11/versatile-blogger-award-thanks-er-mukhtar-zahid/

    Liked by 1 person

  42. This is Indeed a beautiful post and moral lessons learned here. I commend you for your courage and efforts to bring to limelight events around you. I am moved to nominate/award you a well-deserved award. Please visit the link to read the rules and share on your blog. Thank you once again for sharing! XXX Iva.Sylva.

    Liked by 1 person

  43. Nice! Thanks for sharing 💖

    Liked by 2 people

  44. I really enjoyed your powerful story.
    Thank you for sharing

    Liked by 1 person

  45. We always pay some price for our fathers sins

    Liked by 1 person

  46. Rich and poor. The merchant. Poor friends and a good heart.

    Liked by 1 person

  47. ありがとうございます😊
    よろしくお願いします☺️🇯🇵

    Liked by 1 person

  48. Whatsoever it might be, I do not know at all, but I always like old mansions, historical places, ancient stories, ever. Thanks for writing so amazing blog.

    Liked by 1 person

  49. Such a sad tale, but an important one to heed. Kindness and respect not only have spiritual significance but material significance as well.

    Peace

    Liked by 1 person

  50. Again so exquisite and lovely! This is also to inform u that I have nominated u for the Liebster Award. Check this out-https://atuldepak.wordpress.com/2018/12/22/nominated-for-the-liebster-award-2nd/
    Best wishes and regards! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  51. hey Laleh dear, I have nominated you for the sunshine blogger award. Check this out- https://atuldepak.wordpress.com/2018/12/25/nominated-for-the-sunshine-blogger-award/
    Best wishes 🌹

    Liked by 1 person

  52. The sins of the father should not rest on his children’s shoulders. But isn’t that the way too often it is.

    Liked by 1 person

  53. Hey dear Laleh, I have nominated you for the Mystery Blogger Award (https://atuldepak.wordpress.com/2019/01/06/the-mystery-blogger-award/)
    Best Wishes!

    Liked by 1 person

  54. Vengo sempre a sbirciare qui, ma trovo la stessa pagina da mesi, è il blog fermo? O è a me che non appaiono le pagine?
    Grazie.

    Liked by 1 person

      • Hi Leleh! Just came to your fascinating Blog for the first time; gonna take me a while to read everything but the first was so sad; unfortunately one cannot leave a legacy in negativity and that sure was negative. I’m looking forward to reading more! What is the correct way to pronounce your name? Feel free to visit my Blog as well. I am just a new beginner but suggestions and tips for a better Blog are so welcome. I don’t mind constructive criticism.
        Nice to meet you!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Nice to meet you sweetheart. Thanks so much for reading and following. Good job with your blog dear. Laleh means Tulip 🌷. ❤️❤️❤️

        Liked by 1 person

  55. What a beautiful name and it’s meaning!

    Liked by 1 person

  56. That’s a beautiful story. Thanks for helping find your beautiful blog. i hope to read more gradually… for there’s a lot to read here. Though I didn’t understand why the grandchildren chose to live with their past instead of building a new future for themselves. Or was the bad karma of their grandfather so negative that even after generations his progeny couldn’t evade their ill-fate ! Thank you Tulip Laleh Chini

    Liked by 1 person

  57. As I asked for translating two of your stories, here is the second one. I hope you give me honour to do more.
    http://sabaniazsiddique.home.blog/2019/04/10/destinyسرنوشت-a-voice-from-iran-قسمت/

    Liked by 1 person

  58. Your story shows us how the sins of the fathers can destroy the lives of the children. A thought provoking story, indeed. Thank you.

    Liked by 1 person

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