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Norooz|نوروز


 

 

The exact moment that the sun crosses the celestial equator and equalizes night and day is calculated each year which marks the beginning of Persian New Year.

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Millions of people celebrate the Persian new year all over the world at the exact time no matter what time zone they are in.

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Norooz goes back thousands of years to when Persia was a great empire that covered a huge part portion of the map, which nowadays has been divided to many different countries.

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Many of those countries still celebrate some of the old Persian traditions. Back in Iran, Norooz is an important holiday where all the schools are closed for two weeks.

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Norooz started with the Zoroastrians but is now celebrated by many different religious. The Iranian calendar starts from the first day of spring which is March 21st   of each year. Close families gather around a special table or spread where every single item set on it has a special meaning that is wished upon the new year.

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The most important items on the table are 7 things with names that start with an “S” in the farsi language:

1)    Seeb (apple) represents health

2)    Sabzeh (fresh greens) represents youthfulness

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3)    Senjed (Russian olive) represents the start of fatality

4)    Samanoo (a special sweet made from sprouts) represents fertility of herbaceous?

5)    Sekeh (coin) represents wealth

6)    Serkeh (vinegar) represents the sourness of life

7)    Seer(garlic) for safety

There are other items we place on the table that have special meanings as well. For instance, we place lots of candles to bring luminosity in life, a mirror for brightness, eggs for creation, fish in water for innocence and prosperity, jam and pastry for sweetness, and many other things which have been added in different parts of the world with their own beautiful meanings.

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Norooz ends on the 13th day of spring with a special picnic ceremony where we join the greens and fish from our tables back with nature as we free them into rivers or ponds. People keep their table for the entire 13 days as they circle their visits, starting with the eldest member of the family and usually end with the youngest.

 

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Categories: bedtime story, fable, folk tale, kingdom, Legend, True storyTags: , ,

150 comments

  1. Thanks for sharing! I learned some new things

    Liked by 3 people

  2. Bonjour c’est fort instructif et passionnant au delà de nos coutumes et cultures amicalement
    Bonne journée

    Liked by 2 people

  3. Thank you for sharing these customs 🙂 Refreshing and warm! Enjoy the Spring

    Liked by 2 people

  4. A wondrous article Laleh, I do so enjoy learning about other cultures, and the celebration of the Persian new year is fascinating. Thank you my dear……

    Liked by 2 people

  5. Some lovely customs. Happy new year, Laleh!

    Liked by 2 people

  6. It’s good to remember our traditions; it’s good to remember the reasons for them.

    Liked by 2 people

  7. Beautiful subject you have chosen for today’s story, it’s very interesting to know the Persian’s new year tradition. Happy new year and happy norooz and thank you for posting these beautiful stories every week.

    Liked by 2 people

  8. New Year Greetings, friend!!

    Liked by 2 people

  9. two weeks off, wow! what a nice time of year for this. 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

  10. Now that is a true celebration! Beautiful and fascinating! Thank you greatly for sharing.

    Liked by 2 people

  11. Happy Norooz! 🙂 I was wondering how some of the words in Parsi is so similar to many Indian languages. The world does feel one 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

  12. My cousin’s wife is from Iran. She leaves to Iran every year to celebrate with her family or her family goes visit her in Dubai.

    Liked by 2 people

  13. Reblogged this on lampmagician and commented:
    Great explanation 😊 Thank You 🙏❤🙏❤ #Persian #nowruz #oldculture

    Liked by 2 people

  14. I must admit I knew nothing really of the Persian new year or Norooz, which I’d never even heard of. I feel educated and less ignorant now! It’s interesting to have 7 things that start with an S, all representing important elements in life. There’s such meaning and compassion involved, I love celebrations like this that focus on bringing people together and looking towards gratefulness and bright days ahead. A really fascinating post, Laleh, thanks for sharing!
    Caz xx

    Liked by 2 people

  15. Very interesting! Happy Norooz!

    Liked by 2 people

  16. I didn’t know that. Very interesting, Happy Norooz 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

  17. Many blessings to you, dear Laleh, as you celebrate Norooz! ❤

    Liked by 2 people

  18. Thank you for sharing and a Happy Norooz!!.. through your eyes we can see the beauty and wonders of other people and cultures, not the negative views found in the news, etc… 🙂

    “Life gives us brief moments with another, but sometimes in those brief moments we get memories that last a lifetime, So live that your memories will be part of your happiness.”

    Liked by 2 people

  19. Happy Bright & Luminous Norooz, dear Laleh! Thanks for telling about it. You have a very interesting tradition of celebrating. And what sort of gifts are considered to be traditional for this feast?

    Liked by 2 people

  20. Always interesting to learn how different places and cultures mark special occasions. I like the sound of new year in Iran!

    Liked by 2 people

  21. Very interesting! Happy Norooz!

    Liked by 2 people

  22. Wish you happy prosperous New Year.
    Thanks for the information
    We too have some similarities in the new year celebration
    According to Hindu Calendar in India yoo New year starts in Spring
    We too place certain things like Mirror, coin, rice and some grains , fruits etc.
    To invite New Year with prosperity
    ✌️👍👏👏👏💐💐

    Liked by 2 people

  23. Nice piece of history and love your pics of Persepolis!

    Liked by 2 people

  24. Thanks for sharing. Very interesting information. We Indians celebrate the festival alongside the Parsees however some things were not known. Your post is informative.

    Liked by 2 people

  25. Dear Laleh, with your posts you definitely bring more understanding about the beautiful Persian culture and it’s traditions. They are so sincere and authentic. When I was married for 21 years to a Persian man, I truly loved and lived all the beauty of Nowruz, and actually I still do in my own way, needless to say I love the Persian cuisine.

    Liked by 2 people

  26. Thank you for sharing with us this post!!

    May the stars shine upon you,
    May the flowers fill your heart with beauty,
    May hope forever wipe away your tears,
    and above all, May this New year be wonderful!

    Send you my love!!!!
    Saal-e-no mobaarak (سال نو مبارک)

    Liked by 2 people

  27. It is beautiful. I wish you joy.

    Liked by 2 people

  28. Wonderful! Norooz Mubarak, Laleh! ❤️

    Liked by 2 people

  29. What a neat idea! Love seeing the table with all the items for celebrating spring, very meaningful.

    Liked by 2 people

  30. Happy New year. How was the celebration? Hope it all went well. Greetings from Italy.

    Liked by 2 people

  31. Happy New Year! Nice to connect this way!

    Liked by 2 people

  32. An interesting tradition. It’s good that people still respect. Our roots are important.

    Liked by 2 people

  33. I like the custom of the new year beginning on the first day of Spring! Wishing you and your family a Happy New Year! 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

  34. Thank you for writing about a tradition I never heard about. The world is big, we have so meny different cultures, but everybody hopes and wishes for health, prosperity, peace 🙂

    Liked by 3 people

  35. Learned something new today! Thanks for sharing! 🙂 Happy new year! 🙂

    Liked by 3 people

  36. Happy new year! I am so glad you shared this information with us. Wishing you a blessed year ahead.

    Liked by 2 people

  37. Happy New Year, even if its late!

    Liked by 2 people

  38. Some wonderful customs. Happy new year, Laleh!❤️❤️

    Liked by 2 people

  39. On the occasion of the New Year, I wish you good days. Be happy.

    Liked by 2 people

  40. I’m late to the party but Norooz mobarak, Laleh!

    Liked by 3 people

  41. Nice Norooz.Happy Norooz to all persians!!🌹🌹🌹🌹🌹🌹🌹🌹

    Liked by 2 people

  42. Laleh, see the entry on my blog. I’ve developed your post titled “Judgment”. At the end of the post I sent a thank you to you.
    Acknowledgment in part II
    Thank you and best regards
    https://bezpukania.wordpress.com/2019/03/23/malzenstwo-to-sprawiedliwe-urzadzenie- cz-i/

    https://bezpukania.wordpress.com/2019/03/26/milosc-gra-na-wszystkich-strunach-serca- cz-ii/

    Liked by 2 people

  43. Interesting knowledge I had no idea of.Thanks for such deep knowledge.

    Liked by 2 people

  44. Thanks for the cultural lesson. I love the nature part of this holiday.

    Liked by 2 people

  45. Happy Norooz, Laleh! What a lovely tradition! I knew nothing about it, so thank you for sharing.

    Liked by 2 people

  46. What a lovely time that must be – starting the new year in spring is good.

    Liked by 2 people

  47. I never knew these facts… Thanks for sharing this post..

    Liked by 1 person

  48. Thank you for this great history lesson, Laleh! Now i also know where the English people got their quote “One apple a day keeps the doctor away!” Wonderful to see how Europeans borought most of their knowledge from other continents (but rarely remember this Lol) Michael

    Liked by 1 person

  49. Nic, I have not thought of food as symbolic like this, which may be worth doing as with religious traditions.

    Liked by 1 person

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